Sign in with LinkedIn Subscribe on YouTube

Study: Six in seven rugby concussion unreported

3News
"For every one concussion that you see we identified, there were six concussions that were not seen and were not being reported."
The results took him by surprise. Mr King tested more than 100 Wellington premier rugby and league players over three years using what's called a saccadic reading test, which he calls his number-one tool. Players do a baseline reading pre-season and again after the games.

Watch the Video

How vision can help diagnose concussions

optometrytimeslogo
“For decades, optometrists have used the King-Devick test to aid in the diagnosis of ocular motor dysfunction and a need for vision therapy,” says Marc Taub, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD, chief of vision therapy and rehabilitation and supervisor of the residency program in pediatrics and vision therapy at Southern College of Optometry. “It is reliable and easy to perform in patients of any age or cognitive ability.

Read the Article

Rethinking concussions: Technology helping to broaden the picture

SI
“It’s about that Jell-O within that cranium,” says Dennis Cardone, an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Langone Medical Center, and co-director of NYU’s Concussion Center. “How it moves around, and how it collides with the cranium itself.” Because a significant proportion of our brains is used to process visual information, many of the symptoms that can be used to diagnose concussions affect vision. Cardone uses a screening test called the King-Devick test, which was developed in 1976 to measure deficiencies in eye movement during reading.

Read the Article

Heady Ambitions: The University of Florida Study with NCAA and DoD

UFlorida
The King-Devick Test is one method Clugston and his team have used since 2011. The test is a two-minute challenge that requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards or on an iPad. UF collects baseline data for the King-Devick Test as with all of its concussion tests, and if an athlete is suspected of suffering head trauma, he or she is re-tested. If the time needed to complete the test is any longer than their baseline result, the athlete is removed from play and further evaluated.

UF and the University of Pennsylvania were the first schools to implement the King-Devick Test as part of their concussion management programs. “That’s something we feel is important to add in to the other concussions tests that we already do,’’ Clugston said. “It’s the only one of the simple tests that really looks at vision, and vision is a big component of the brain.”

Read The Article

Study Finds Easy Test For Concussions Can Help Non-medical Volunteers Keep Athletes Safe

cbs-philly
Dr. Kurt Miceli, Medical Director of Bancroft, a neurological rehabilitation facility says it could prevent more injuries. “I’ve seen numbers one and a half million up to three million concussions a year, tremendous amounts of folks who are undergoing these concussions and the concern is to really have our kids or whoever it is not to suffer a second one.”

Read the Article

Video: Two-Minute Sideline Test Could Be Best Way To ID Concussions

NBC_Nightly_News_

Video: A simple test can be done after a head injury and is a reliable way to quickly diagnose a concussion.

Watch The Video

Flash Card Concussion Test Brings Simplicity, Accuracy to Sideline

Neurology Advisor
The simple assessment, which doesn't require medical knowledge to conduct or evaluate, may be especially useful in the youth sports arena where trainers and team physicians are few and far between. The rapid, low-tech evaluation may also help keep injured athletes from re-entering play and risking second impact syndrome, which can be fatal.

Read the Article

MHSAA to pilot sideline concussion test kits

wood tv8
“We want to make sure that those communities that have very few resources for sideline detection can get some,” Robert said. “If we can do that for our schools — have a quick way to perform the test and have it interface seamlessly with a report to this office and perfect permanent record — then we have really made a contribution to detection and aftercare of our students.”

Watch the Video

Don't Blink. The King-Devick Test: A Rapid, Sideline Visual Assessment Tool to Assist in Detection of Concussion

SMR
Take Home Message: The King-Devick test is a quick and reliable method to assess vision, eye movements, language function, and attention. An athlete with a concussion tends to complete the test slower than his/her preseason assessment while other athletes improve over time.

Read the Article

Simple vision test may help catch concussions

reuters
"In the youth leagues in particular, when there may not be doctors or athletic trainers on the sidelines when a kid gets hit, this enables parents with proper training to participate in the preliminary assessment of concussions," said study author Dr. Steven Galetta, a researcher at New York University Langone Concussion Center. "It's so affordable and easy to administer that any coach or parent could use it to determine when an injured child can return to the game and when they need to sit out."

Read the Article

Video: Potential game-changer for safety of young athletes

fox news
Watch Jenna Lee talk about Head Injury with Laura Balcer, MD, from NYU.

Watch the Video

Simple Vision Test Detects Concussion in Young Athletes

medscape
"A vision test absolutely needs to be added," Dr Galetta told Medscape Medical News. "This one has been the most rigorously tested on the sidelines, and it's easy to administer by parents and others."

Read the Article

A Simple Flashcard Test to Detect Concussions

The_New_York_Times_logo
Overall, the King-Devick test had by far the greatest accuracy and lowest risk of false positives. The upshot, Dr. Galetta believes, is that parents and coaches “should absolutely consider” familiarizing themselves with the King-Devick test and administering it to young athletes before the season starts, then having those baseline numbers and the test itself handy on the sidelines.

Read the Article

This 2-Minute Test Helps Parents Easily Figure Out If A Child Has A Concussion

Huff Post
Simple as it may sound, the K-D test actually does a better job of detecting concussions (with a 92 percent success rate) than two better-known methods: a "timed tandem gait test" similar to a walk-the-line test (87 percent), and a cognitive test known as the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (68 percent).

While the success rate of the King-Devick test is impressive, Balcer emphasized to HuffPost that if possible, parents should have their child perform all three of the above-mentioned concussion tests when he or she takes a hard hit. The reason could not be more clear. In tandem, the three tests can detect concussions at a rate that is truly hard to believe -- 100 percent.

Read the Article

Two minute sideline test shows if student athletes have a concussion

examiner-logo
“Given that concussions may cause devastating short and long-term cognitive effects, tools like vision testing that can objectively diagnose a concussion are critical,” says Laura Balcer, MD, co-author of the study.

Read the Article

Simple Sideline Test Shown Effective In Diagnosing Concussion In Student Athletes

nym-logo
“Our findings in children and collegiate athletes show how a simple vision test can aid in diagnosis of concussion at all levels of sport,” says Dr. Galetta, who is also a professor of ophthalmology at NYU Langone. “Adding the King-Devick test to the sideline assessment of student athletes following a head injury can eliminate the guesswork for coaches and parents when deciding whether or not a student should return to play.”

Read The Article

Concussion Detection Dilemma: How Do You Really Know?

ncaa-logo1
But without tell-tale signs, the clinician must turn to concussion detection tools to help guide the decision about returning the athlete back to gameplay.

Read The Article

King-Devick Test on WBEZ Morning Shift

MorningShift_CMS_tile_1200x900_15
LISTEN: As researchers learn more about the often crippling effects on sports-related concussions, legislators across the country worked to establish protocols and procedures for student athletes. We host Senator Dan Kotowski and Dr. Steve Devick to dig deeper into the issue and what lawmakers and schools can do to address it. Begins at 33:45.

Listen To The Interview

US National Teams Implement King-Devick Test

Training Conditioning
Dr. Patrick Kersey, Medical Director for USA Football, couldn't have been more impressed with the implementation process and overall results. "The implementation process was a total breeze," Kersey said. "Very quick and easy to understand and administer, and can be done in almost any environment - optimal for the sports world."

"The actual science behind it and it being a potential valuable tool that fills a much needed void in the sideline management and evaluation of head injuries was my initial attraction," Kersey stated. "This test can provide some near immediate and important information to the medical provider, athlete, and coaches about head injuries and help answer the challenging question of 'does he/she have a concussion' and 'is it safe for them to return to play?'"

Kersey also pointed out the King-Devick Test would complement some of the more popular concussion tools that many organizations are already using, such as ImPACT.

Read the Article

Mayo Clinic adds its name to sidelines concussion test

qct_logo_square
"Studies have indicated that the King-Devick test is an effective tool for the real-time evaluation of concussion because it looks at rapid eye movement and attention, both of which are affected by concussions," said Dr. David Dodick, a neurosurgeon and the director of the Mayo Clinic's concussion program in Phoenix.

Read The Article

The simple concussion test the NFL does not use

usaolins1
"It has now emerged as a gold standard, I think, for sideline diagnosis for concussions," Dodick said. "So it's only a matter of time, I believe, once the word gets out, where there's going to have to be a very good reason for them not to use it."

Read The Article

Mayo and King-Devick Test Have Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Test

KD_MC_stacked(2)-2
“Studies have indicated that the King-Devick test is an effective tool for the real-time evaluation of concussion because it looks at rapid eye movement and attention - both are affected by concussions,” says David Dodick, M.D., Mayo Clinic neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s concussion program.

Read The Article

High schools confront athlete concussions

lohud
Tests administered on the sidelines, such as the King-Devick and the Standardized Assessment of Concussions (SAC), require athletes to quickly read numbers or words, or to recall words. Athletes must equal or better their previous baseline test score in a set amount of time to get back into a game — and that is if they are otherwise asymptomatic. "Kids are still not honest. They want to work through it," Herceg said.

Read The Article

Reston Hockey Club Targets Concussion Prevention

Capital News Service
Injury liaisons such as Shaman do not need medical training to perform a series of simple assessments to check if a player may be suffering a concussion, Schmidt said. Each injury liaison performs a King-Devick test, a two-minute test conducted on the sidelines that requires a player to read single digit numbers displayed on cards, to check to see if there are any symptoms of head injuries.

Read The Article

Vision-based test accurate and easy for concussion screening

fox322
“More than 50 percent of brain pathways are responsible for controlling eye movement, so injuries to the brain almost universally affect eye movement,” said Dr. David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic, who is also the Director of the Sport Neurology and Concussion Program.

Read The Article

Concussion Awareness Impacting Youth Levels

atlxtv
Chasan’s team has provided the league with the King-Devick Test, a reading assessment tool that they’ve taught the coaches to use. Essentially, the King-Devick tool allows the coaches to compare a player’s typical brain function – as each player is baseline-tested before the season – with the player’s function directly after a suspected concussion.

Read The Article

Ongoing Evolution: Understanding Concussion’s Effects

12220547-pn-blue-grey
Some surveys suggest there are 10-times as many concussions that are undetected than are detected. Along a similar line, Doug King, MD, and colleagues, wrote a recent paper showing that in rugby players undetected concussions are quite common. He routinely tested his rugby players with the King-Devick test and found that undetected concussions were three to four times more common compared to detected concussions.

Read The Article

Vision-based testing vital for concussion screening

optometrytimeslogo
Dr. Leong called a recent article published in The Lancet Neurology a must-read. "It highlights the important role of optometry, saying that vision-based testing is vital in managing all forms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and provides a sensitive approach for sideline or post-injury concussion screening."

Read the Article

Florida Bill Protects Student Athletes From Concussions

CBS_miami_logo
Mary Medina, the school’s head athletic trainer gave him the concussion standard ‘King-Devick’ test. “That is a short 32 second test where they read numbers and Oscar was off by a couple seconds,” said Medina. The test measured his ability to think and respond to a series of questions that he’d already taken in the past. Since he already knew the answers, he shouldn’t have had any difficulty; but that wasn’t the case. “We pulled him!” said Medina.

Read the Article

Sideline concussiontesting being implemented by Lincoln County R-III



The King-Devick is a simple test that can be administered on the sidelines in less than two minutes, explains Troy Buchanan Principal Dr. Jerry Raines “It’s a very fast, two minute, sideline examination. We’re making database decisions instead of subjective decisions. In the past it was ‘What’s today? What did you have first hour?’ Those are more subjective. We always subscribe to ‘When in doubt, sit ‘em out,’ but this allows us to have data behind that decision. Ultimately it’s for the safety of our kids.”

Read The Article

Concussion Head Games - Why brain research and baseline testing should inspire a public cry for action

Specifically, we are recommending that the King-DevickTest be performed by all Doctors who work with children, especially Doctors of Optometry to establish baseline for all patients, especially for young children and teens who are at higher risk.

Read The Article

Visual tracking problems and silent concussions - WHY parents, the public and Optometrists need to know

Therefore, knowing that concussions can be identified 100% of the time with the King-Devick Test, here is another question for parents and the public to ask. Why are we not routinely administering the King-Devick Testing on children, 6 years and older, so that their optometric record establishes baseline in saccadic eye movement?

Read The Article

Pop Warner Arizona partners with Mayo Clinic on tackling concussions

AZ Pop Warner
Participants will take the King-Devick Test, which provides an objective measure of reaction time, eye movement and mental clarity.

Read The Article

A Better Test for Evaluating Sports Concussion on the Sideline?

nr_logo
The King-Devick test may be a more objective and accurate method for sideline evaluation of sports-related concussion than the Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3), which is the current standard, according to research reported at the 56th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society.

Read The Article

Mayo Clinic Study Says Eye-Tracking Devices Offer Added Pilot Safety

Mayo-Clinic-Logo
In the new study, Mayo Clinic researchers tested the feasibility of using a portable eye-tracking device [King-Devick Test] in a simulated environment as a way to detect the early phases of hypoxia.

Read The Press Release

UF Helps Improve Subtle Concussion Diagnosis

gainesville sun
In an article published this month in the journal “Neurology: Clinical Practice,” the researchers report that adding one simple vision test detected 100 percent of concussions that occurred during games or in practice.

Read The Article

Simple test helps doctors catch more concussions on the field

UF-Health logo
“This is the first study that has shown that adding a vision test helps to identify more athletes with concussion and shows the vision-based King-Devick test is very effective in a college setting,” said Dr. Laura Balcer, a professor of neurology and population health at NYU.

Read the Article

LA Students Undergo 'Baseline' Tests To Measure Concussion Effects

cbs-los-angeles-logo
About 1,200 students at Loyola High School, including non-athlete students, are being given a series of tests, known as baseline concussion test, designed to measure brain function.

Read the Article

Interview: Bert Vargas, MD, on SCAT3 vs King-Devick Test

nr_logo
Bert Vargas, MD, compares two tools for evaluating sports-related concussion on the sidelines.

Listen to the Interview

Former pro soccer player Claire Zimmeck battles concussion syndrome

NY Daily News
Patients who are dealing with symptoms such as balance issues and vision problems are often referred to a neurologist such as Dr. Laura Balcer, who has done pioneering research on the link between eye movement and brain function.

Read the Article

CMCC & Rugby Ontario Partner to Administer Baseline Concussion Measures For More Than 235 Junior Provincial Athletes

sportsXpressComLogo
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto volunteered their day to aid in the administration of baseline concussion measures with seven different Rugby Ontario junior provincial teams for over 235 athletes.

Read the Article

Saccadic eye training associated with improved reading fluency, study shows

healio_safe_image
"The results of this pilot study suggest that the King-Devick remediation software may be effective in significantly improving reading fluency through rigorous practice of eye movements," Amaal Starling, MD, Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study, said in the release.

Read the Article

Mayo Clinic: In-School Eye Movement Training Improves Early Reading Fluency

Mayo-Clinic-Logo
“The results of this pilot study suggest that the King-Devick remediation software may be effective in significantly improving reading fluency through rigorous practice of eye movements,” says Dr. Starling. “What our study also found was that there was an even greater improvement between first and third grade versus third and fourth graders, which means there may be a critical learning period that will determine reading proficiency.”

Read the Press Release

This Way In: The Latest Concussion Research

neurology now-logo
“Given the many brain pathways involved in concussion, we think that a combination of cognitive, balance and vision tests may be best to improve diagnosis of concussion in athletes,” says Laura Balcer, MD, Fellow of AAN, professor and vice chair of neurology at New York University Langone Medical Center.

Read the Article

King-Devick Test CEO Joins Experts at White House Safe Sports Concussion Summit

KD_MC_stacked(2)-2
Dr. Devick is committed to making reliable and objective sideline concussion testing for all athletes accessible and affordable. "The King-Devick Test helps provide a safer sporting environment for youth athletes by accurately screening for concussion," he says. "It's our responsibility as parents, coaches and clinicians to identify concussions in order to remove them from play and allow children the proper time to recover from concussion so they can safely return to learn and play."

Read the Press Release

Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions

kare11
Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Read the Article

Mayo Clinic researchers validate rapid sideline concussion test for youth athletes

Mayo-Clinic-Logo
“The King-Devick test represents a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective tool to identify concussion on the sideline and make appropriate game-time, remove-from-play decisions,” Dr. Amaal Starling says.

Read the Press Release

Staten Island soccer coach keeps kids safe with King-Devick test for concussion (with photos/video)

SILive.comEverything_Staten_Island_163917
Balancing fun and competition with safety, Ernest Murdukhayev, a director of SB4U Soccer Academy and the Jewish Community Center programs, is using the King-Devick test to assess the seriousness of any head bangs his players encounter.

Read the Article

Vision Test Improves Concussion Detection

medscape
"I do think this is enough to recommend this vision test be used routinely," Dr. Clugston commented. "This test is less subjective than some of the other tests used currently. An assessment of balance is always very subjective, and cognition tests can be too. But the vision test just involves reading numbers from a screen as fast you can. It is very simple and less easily manipulated by the athlete. But it is best used in combination with the standard tests."

Read the Article

Vision Test Helps With Concussions

NBC Local 15
Researchers found the time to complete the test was longer for 79-percent of players who were later found to have a concussion. When combined with other assessments, the sideline test helped diagnose 100-percent of concussions. Experts say using a vision based test on the sidelines may help detect concussions more quickly ... and keep athletes from getting injured further.

Watch the Video

Sideline concussion test gets a new thumbs-up

LA Times
The King-Devick test capitalizes on a subtle but important symptom of brain injury: a disruption in the eyes' ability to travel smoothly across a page, and to shift direction upon the brain's command.

Read the Article

More Evidence That Vision Test on Sidelines May Help Diagnose Concussion

AAN-logo
The study provides more evidence that the King-Devick test, a one-minute test where athletes read single-digit numbers on index cards, can be used in addition to other tests to increase the accuracy in diagnosing concussion.

Read the Press Release

Simple tests could improve sideline concussion diagnosis, study shows

www.foxnews.com
New research presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia indicates that a quick vision test, known as the King-Devick test, combined with a series of other simple tests, could yield near-perfect concussion detection rates on the sidelines of a game.

Read the Article

Sport-related Concussions: Tips for the Coach

USSA
Many sports medicine professionals suggest that those coaches who do not have immediate access to an athletic trainer use easy and reliable screening tools. One of the most effective screening tools is the King-Devick test. Personally, I recommend every high school and youth coach to use this screening tool. It is very easy to learn and does not require a medical professional to administer. The King-Devick test can be easily implemented into an existing concussion management protocol.

Read the Article

2013 Top Stories in Eye Care: Neuro-Ophthalmology

practice-update-logo1
PracticeUpdate: Would you sum up in a single sentence why you chose this development as the top story of the past year?

Dr. Press: The merging of technology available to administer tests such as the King-Devick saccade test, and how to dovetail this information with batteries such as the ImPACT Test, represent a significant advancement in clinical concepts as well as tools.

Read the Article

United States Sports Academy Tackling Concussions in Southern Alabama Community

USSA
One of the main benefits of this concussion program is the donation of an effective and reliable concussion screening device known as the King-Devick Test, an objective, rapid sideline screening test for concussions that can be administered by coaches, athletic trainers, and athletic support personnel.

Read the Article

Staying Ahead of the Game

NYU Physician
The NYU Cover Story, notes: “Drs. Galetta and Balcer believe the King-Devick test works because at least 50 percent of the brain’s circuits are involved in vision. Thus the test can pick up deficiencies occurring across a wide range of neurological geography.

Read the Article

University physician researches concussions

observer
“Right now, these tests — King-Devick, SCAT2, balance, computerized assessment — are considered the standard of care, or the best procedure, for diagnosing concussions,” head Notre Dame University Physician Dr. Jim Moriarty said. “The key for us is if you’re a physician on the sidelines, you’d like to know the tests you’re running are reliable. There are symptoms that confirm concussions, but most people don’t have that. Most people have the lesser symptoms which cause you to have doubts whether you’re making the right choice or not.”

Read the Article.

High Altitude Hypoxia Can Be Detected Before Symptoms Are Apparent, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Mayo-Clinic-Logo
The Mayo Clinic study team used the King-Devick neurocognitive performance test, which is commonly used to identify cognitive changes related to sports-related concussions, and to assess cognitive function under conditions of low oxygen-simulating altitude. The King-Devick test assesses the time in viewing, identifying and reading aloud a series of numbers on three consecutive test cards. Based on test times of 25 participants, the study concluded that the King-Devick test is an effective tool to detect "impairment of cognitive performance at a presymptomatic stage of hypoxia."

Read the Article

Press Release: ImPACT® Partners with King-Devick Test in Support of Multifaceted Approach to Concussion Management

impact

Read the Press Release

The King-Devick Test is widely supported by published neurological research as an accurate and reliable method for identifying athletes with concussion.  "The partnership between King-Devick Test and ImPACT highlights the need for schools and organizations to utilize both remove-from-play and return-to-play concussion management tools to ensure the safety of all athletes," said Steve Devick chief executive officer of King-Devick Test.

Visual Screening Test for Rapid Sideline Determination of Concussive and Sub-concussive Events

cns-logo
The need for sideline rapid assessment of mild head injury is fundamental to limiting the deleterious effects of repeated impacts to the head. The great majority of athletes are at the youth sports level and not in collegiate or professional sports, which leaves many important decisions to be made by parents and coaches on the sideline. This structural element of sport is unlikely to change since allocating medically trained people to youth sports will require unavailable financial resources. Accordingly, empowering adults to administer a simple, rapid, yet effective test is paramount to preventing repeated head injury. As increasing evidence suggests that even mild impact to the head can lead to accruing neuropathology, it may be prudent to routinely perform sideline testing for players involved in even modest collisions. This could help avoid return to play of athletes with sub-concussive impacts as knowledge about head injury continues to evolve.

Read the Article

Raising Canes: It's Great To Be A Miami Hurricane

Miami_Hurricanes_logo.svg

Steve Devick and Chris Nowinski discuss concussions and football with the University of Miami.

Watch the Video

Academy Provides Concussion Training to Area Football Coaches

USSA

With help from an Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) grant and King-Devick, the Academy has made presentations to more than 50 coaches about concussions and given training on how to use the King-Devick test to quickly and accurately determine on the sideline if any player has suffered head trauma. In addition, each coach and team received a comprehensive manuals about concussion safety, fact sheets, and King-Devick Playbooks that included the tests to administer on players.

Read the Article


Raising Canes: Ahead Of The Game, Pt. Two (S3, E10)

Miami_Hurricanes_logo.svg
The latest episode of Raising Canes continues the showcase of Miami's industry-leading concussion testing procedures utilized by the sports medicine staff.

Watch the Video

King-Devick Test on the Today Show

Today
Dr. Rahul Jandial demonstrates King-Devick Test on the Today Show!

Watch the Video

High-tech, low-tech and concussion!

aoa-logo
The King-Devick Test (KD) is one solution that is relatively low-tech but has high-tech abilities and research supporting its use for TBI/concussion and sports. This test has been available for more than 25 years to assess oculomotor dysfunction.

Read the Article

King-Devick Test: An Important Part of Sideline Concussion Screening Battery

momsteam_logo
The K-D measures the time it takes for an athlete to read a series of single digit numbers displayed on index-sized cards. Previous studies of boxers and mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters (2), collegiate athletes in contact sports (3), and in a New Zealand rugby league (4,5) found that an increase (worsening) in the time needed to complete the one-minute K-D was predictive of concussion. While K-D detects fast eye (i.e. saccadic) movements, it also captures language and concentration, all of which have been shown to be impaired as a result of concussion.

Read the Article

Rinkside Test Accurately Helps Detect Professional Ice Hockey Team's Concussions in Minutes

WSJ
The King-Devick Test has the benefit of providing objective baseline and post-injury data for rapid comparison. This may help athletic trainers and coaches determine whether players should be removed from games.

Read the Article

Club Measures How Hard Rugby's Hits Really Are

The_New_York_Times_logo
Last year he introduced to the club the King-Devick test, a screening that can help determine whether a player has suffered a concussive incident during the game.
A player does an initial test in the preseason to record a baseline score. The players are then tested after every game, and if anyone is three-seconds slower than his baseline score, he is deemed to have suffered a concussion. Because the test is calculated on an iPad, it can even be used during a game if a concussion is suspected.
Last year there were five concussions witnessed on the field, but another 17 were diagnosed through the King-Devick test (which is named after another King, not Doug).

Read the Article

Sports Legacy Institute partners with MLL to create concussion program for 2013

Major_League_Lacrosse_logo.svg
Major League Lacrosse will become the first professional sports organization to mandate the King-Devick test -- an objective rapid sideline screening test of concussions that a growing body of studies show is an effective test for concussion -- as an additional sideline assessment tool.

Read the Article

The King of All Concussion Tests

www.tddaily.com_
The K-D Test serves as a “remove from play” test and is actually more suited to a sports role than one might think. Since players can only be on the sidelines for a few minutes between plays or drives, time is of the essence. The player has to be assessed immediately; continued play with head trauma can be increasingly dangerous. “We do know that if you put a kid back in with concussive symptoms, he’s at really high risk to get hit again,” says Dr. Gillian Hotz of the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.

Read the Article

New Study Supports Chicago Concussion Test System

url
“As a direct result of the findings using the King-Devick Test, the club has implemented a wider concussion awareness program to assist in identification and management of concussion for the upcoming season,” Dr. Doug King, the senior author of the study, said in a news release.

Read the Article

Why the NFL Sucks at Testing for Concussions

www.wired.com
The advantage of the King-Devick is that it’s much more straightforward for an inexperienced physician or coach to grade than the SCAT-2, which relies on subjective analysis of symptoms and test results. Many concussed athletes in the team’s trials have passed the SCAT-2 exam but failed the King-Devick Test.

Read the Article

The unlikely man behind football-slamming documentary "Head Games"

crains
The King-Devick Test has emerged as one of the most promising tools for rapid sideline concussion diagnosis.

Read The Article

Brainiac: How Chicagoan Steve Devick Is Tackling Concussions

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 2.37.42 PM
Steve Devick became involved in the concussion issue because of a graduate school thesis he co-wrote in 1976. That project—now known as the King-Devick Test—has emerged as one of the most promising tools for rapid sideline concussion diagnosis. What’s both beautiful and confounding about the test is its simplicity: it’s administered on three spiral-bound laminated cards, takes less than a minute to complete, and is simply pass/fail.

Read The Article

King-Devick and Dave Duerson Foundation Team Up to Help Young Athletes

USSA
On August 24, 2012 the Dave Duerson Foundation announced that they will be equipping all Chicago Public High Schools with the King-Devick test for sideline screening.  The Foundation, through individual and corporate sponsors, also announced plans to provide the test to schools in other major cities in the U.S.

Read The Article

Dave Duerson family pushing concussion safety to Chicago high school football players

abc_7_chicago_logo
Before the high school football season kicked off Friday night, Chicago public league teams were given concussion kits to help detect and treat injuries to players.

Watch The Video

Duerson's foundation gives concussion kits to schools

Chicago_Tribune_Logo.svg
A foundation named after former Chicago Bear Dave Duerson, who committed suicide last year, donated 80 concussion kits on Friday to football programs at Chicago public high schools.

Read The Article

Duerson Family Foundation Donates Concussion Test Kits to Chicago Public Schools Football Programs

Chicago-Public-Schools
With the kickoff of Chicago’s high school football season tonight, The Dave Duerson Foundation has announced it will donate 80 concussion testing kits covering all Chicago Public Schools’ (CPS) high school football programs. The kits, known as the King-Devick Test, are an effective remove-from-play sideline test administered to student athletes by trained non-medical professionals when concussion-like symptoms occur or are suspected during a game.

Read The Article

Technology may help detect a concussion, but the methods are still evolving

logo_cleve
Another sideline concussion indicator the NFL and others are evaluating is a quick visual exam called the King-Devick test. Originally developed to identify people with the reading disorder dyslexia, the two-minute test involves reciting a series of numbers from flash cards or displayed on an iPad screen.

Read The Article

Video on King-Devick Test for Concussions a Must-See

League of Fans
The King-Devick test is a very accurate, simple and inexpensive way to quickly test for the presence of concussion — right on the sidelines. This is critical because sending an athlete back into action too quickly after a concussion is extremely dangerous.

Read The Article

Concussion Test Inventor Receives U.S. Sports Academy Honors

NBC Local 15
The King-Devick method, a number reading test, was originally used to diagnose defects in micro-eye movement.  Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania said the same test can be used to diagnose a brain injury, keeping young athletes from further damaging their growing minds.

Watch The Video

NFL’s Michael Haynes earns Distinguished Service Award

examiner-logo
“The King-Devick Test provides doctors, athletic trainers, coaches, and even parents, with an easy tool to determine if the athlete should be removed from play to prevent a second head injury, which we now know can have more serious complications if the brain has not yet healed from the first concussion,” says Haynes.

Read The Article

Penn Researchers Study Football Concussions

philadelphia
From the concussions of Eagles DeSean Jackson and Kevin Kolb to the tragic suicide of Penn football star Owen Thomas, Philly has been the epicenter of sports head-injury news. Now, two Penn researchers are poised to put a big dent in the problem

Read The Article

Concussion Research Can’t Be Ignored

USSA
The King-Devick test is a simple and objective rapid sideline-screening test for concussions that can be administered by coaches, trainers, and parents in two minutes or less.  Some sports medicine professionals have called the test “the missing link” in concussion safety protocols.

Read The Article

New Study Confirms Value of King-Devick Test in Sideline Assessment of Concussion

momsteam_logo
A simple, two-minute test given athletes on the sports sideline provides an accurate and reliable method for quick assessment of concussion in college athletes, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania  and published online in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences.

Read The Article

Ralph Nader Calls For Mandatory Implementation of King-Devick Concussion Test in High School and Youth Sports

League of Fans
Ralph Nader announced today that his League of Fans organization is pushing for the King-Devick sideline concussion test to become mandatory in all sports from high school down to the youth sports level.  The announcement came in conjunction with the release of the League of Fans’ fifth report from its Sports Manifesto, “Concussion Research Can’t Be Ignored.”

Read The Article

Concussion Study Gets Field Tested

Daily Pennsylvanian
The King-Devick test allows us to asses the objective findings by examining an area of the brain that is impossible for the athletes to memorize or cheat on.

Read The Article

Quick, Simple Test Can Detect Concussion in Athletes

US_News_World_Report_Logo1
This rapid screening test provides an effective way to detect early signs of concussion, which can improve outcomes and hopefully prevent repetitive concussions

Read The Article

Researchers Cite Existing Test For Concussions

PhiComLogo_Header11_221x67
Millions of athletes a year suffer head trauma, and there is growing evidence that repeat concussions - especially without time for rest and healing - may lead to permanent neurological damage.

Read The Article

Sideline Test Accurately Detects Athletes' Concussions in Minutes

usaolins1
A vision test that can be administered in a minute on the sidelines could be an effective tool to detect concussions, researchers say.

Read The Article

New Test May Make It Easier To Diagnose Concussions

cbs-baltimore
“The coach says, ‘Let’s see you do the King-Devick test.  If you’re five seconds slower on the King-Devick test, the coach has a reason to bench you,’” [Dr. David] Bishai said.

Read The Article

Quick Sideline Test May Indicate Concussion

newsworkslogo2
A new test that can be performed at the sidelines of sporting events can accurately detect concussions in athletes in less than a minute.

Read The Article

Could Concussions Affect Aaron Rodgers' Super Bowl Performance?

fox news
The test is so effective because it’s able to capture impairments of eye movement, attention, language and other symptoms of impaired brain function, according to the researchers.

Read The Article

Housecall for Health - Athletes Risking Their Future Playing With Head Injuries

fox news
To play or not to play? That is the question athletes often ask after suffering head injuries

Listen To The Recording

1-Minute Sideline Test Predicts Concussions

webmd-logo
The test is simple. Before the game, a coach or trainer shows each athlete a set of three index cards. Each card has a series of numbers scattered across eight lines. The athlete reads the numbers from left to right.

Read The Article

Sideline Test Accurately Detects Athletes' Concussions in Minutes, Study Shows

logo
A simple test performed at the sideline of sporting events can accurately detect concussions in athletes, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Read The Article

Sideline Test Can Detect Concussions in Minutes

fox news
The test is so effective because it’s able to capture impairments of eye movement, attention, language and other symptoms of impaired brain function, according to the researchers.

Read The Article

New Sideline Test Detects Concussions in Minutes: Study

NBC_10_
The one-minute King-Devick test is a rapid way to detect early signs of concussions in athletes, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine say the test is accurate.

Watch The Video

Concussion Test Moves Toward the Playing Field

LA Times
A two-minute test that can be administered on the sidelines of a sporting event revealed the disruptive effects of brain trauma as reliably as a longer and more unwieldy concussion test used by the U.S. military, according to a study published this week online in the journal Neurology.

Read The Article